Category Archives: Uncategorized

This Week in Beer: The News You Can Booze

This-Week-in-Beer-News

This Week in Beer will be an aggregator of stories we thought were important or fun in our world of potables. If you saw something we missed or hate something we listed, let us know in the comments. And stop trying to correct everyone all the time, it’s unnerving.

Last week we announced the BLAST! off of our new 12oz Brooklyn BLAST!

A wonderful article looking at the renaissance in airport watering holes.

Eric Shepard, of Beer Marketer’s Insights, takes us through the 9 beers America’s not drinking anymore.

Join Totally Stockholm for a stroll through our new neighborhood.

And while your shopping this holiday don’t forget the Brooklyn Brewery store. *cough* shameless plug *cough*

 

Brooklyn Brewery BrooklynBrewery Brooklyn Lager Brooklyn Brewery Mash Garrett Oliver Steve Hindy Brooklyn Lager BrooklynLager Sorachi #GoldDots

Mash Files: Philly

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Any time you arrive in Philly and get to head straight to a lunch at Amisyou know you are in for a good week, especially when you end that evening at  Zahov for dinner.   Tuesday morning I headed over to the Belgian Caféto start prepping for our Local 2 Ways dinner with an old chef and friend , Evan Seplow.  Famous for their Mussels, the Belgian did not disappoint. A full dining room of guests enjoyed Heaping bowls of citrus infused mussels along with the refreshing taste of Sorachi Ace.  The lemon verbena nuances of this farmhouse saison perfectly balanced the creamy bite of the mussels and the tart orange notes of the broth.  Local 1 was a welcomed companion to a pulled duck risotto with dried cherries and seared duck breast, accentuating the light fruit flavors of this golden Belgian Abbey Ale.   With many more courses in between, and a delicious sweet potato beignet with a snifter of Black Chocolate Stout as a finale, guests left feeling satiated and merry.

Slow Supper came early in the week and I jumped from the Belgian over to my Buddy Mike Sultan’s new food truck commissary to prepare for our feast at  Isaiah Zagar’s Magic Garden, withJonathan Adams of Rival Bros Coffee.  Our Ten previous Slow Suppers were situated in incredibly unique spaces,but this was by far the most awe inspiring.  This dynamic mosaic-ed visionary  environment is a true ode to the human imagination and spirit.  The energy surrounding this meal was incredible as family, friends, colleagues, and strangers dined in the most eclectic art space I have ever had the pleasure of hosting a dinner in.  The beautiful collages mirrored the array of dishes that we sent out, a mix of plated and family style courses taking inspiration from German beer hall cuisine.  Ravioli of pheasant and foi gras celebrated our Silver Anniversary Lager, and its artist created one of a kind labels where a perfect match for the decor, as well as the gamey, yet delicate filling of this handmade ravioli topped with pheasant skin cracklings, parley leaf salad, and creamy beer hollandaise.   The star of the show, however was a choucroute. This heaping dish of wonder, jam packed with homemade smoked sausage, boudin blanc, sauerkraut, and confit duck legs left our guests transfixed as they sipped their glasses of Local 2.

The dinners ended early in the week, but the adventures continued with an array of happy hour events at Time, including some rare beer samplings and a serious beer and cheese pairing with Rocco Rainone, an old buddy from Di Bruno Brothers.  New Jersey and Pennsylvania cheeses also graced our flat bread creations at Molly Malloy’s in their newly renovated home at the Reading Terminal Market courtesy of Valley Sheppard Creamery.   Chef Bobby Fisher executed the delicious cheese lathered flat breads that we had created that morning with a slew of local ingredients including double smoked apple wood bacon from Country Time Farm available at the Fair Food Farm stand at the other side of the market.  Reading terminal has a similar feel to the Magic Garden with a delicious and colorful mosaic of market vendors, prepared food items, Amish crafts, book stores, and an eclectic mix of locals, and tourists from all walks of life.

After an exciting week of Mash events I finally got a chance to relax on Wyebrook Farm with my master butcher pal Brian Mayer, and his family.  Brian helped curate Wyebrook’s diverse polyculture, butchery, and curing program with the rest of the staff. This historic property is a true testament to simple, yet sustainable animal farming practices, not to mention a majestic place to spend the afternoon. I ate amazing food in Philly all week long, (and cooked some too) but the best bite I took the whole week was a simply prepared burger with the most flavorful meat I have ever tasted. Here’s to the simple things Philly!

The newly bottled Brooklyn BLAST!

12oz-Blast

Ladies and gentlemen, your favorite beer is now in bottle form.

The first beer launching from our brand new bottling line here in Williamsburg will be Brooklyn BLAST!, our decidedly robust IPA, that I contend to be the greatest beer, ever. Now available in take home 4-packs and gently yet fiercely rolling out to a store near you over the next month. Try to be patient. BLAST! will soon be yours.

bb_blast_4pk_HR smudge

Brooklyn BLAST! has been bouncing around our halls since its introduction as a Brewmaster’s Reserve in 2005. Our long running but not widely shouted answer to those palate-obliterating West Coast IPAs, BLAST! is a balancing act of piney & fruity notes with a sturdy malt foundation.

It’s bold.

It’s big.

It’s Brooklyn.

Who knew we’d enjoy such a kick to the face.

#BLASTOFF

Brooklyn Brewery BrooklynBrewery Brooklyn Lager Brooklyn Brewery Mash Garrett Oliver Steve Hindy Brooklyn Lager BrooklynLager Sorachi #GoldDots

This Week in Beer: The News You Can Booze

This-Week-in-Beer-News

This Week in Beer will be an aggregator of stories we thought were important or fun in our world of potables. If you saw something we missed or hate something we listed, let us know in the comments. And stop trying to correct everyone all the time, it’s unnerving.

Hope you followed one of these pairing posts yesterday. At least try them with leftovers.

Science is the best.

I’m against website sound effects but Taps would be appropriate. Double entendre intended.

Our friend, and new father, Joshua Bernstein gives The Week 7 surprising facts about beer.

In happier news New Belgium and Patagonia have teamed up. So where does that leave us? Marmot? LL Bean? Poler Stuff?

A wonderful showing of craft beer congeniality.

I might have had too much tryptophan and taken a wrong turn on google, but if you’re ever in Istanbul. Craft beer in Turkey.

Also of note, the holidays are coming up so if any of you generous folks want to get me something.

 

Brooklyn Brewery BrooklynBrewery Brooklyn Lager Brooklyn Brewery Mash Garrett Oliver Steve Hindy Brooklyn Lager BrooklynLager Sorachi #GoldDots

This Week in Beer: The News You Can Booze

This-Week-in-Beer-News

This Week in Beer will be an aggregator of stories we thought were important or fun in our world of potables. If you saw something we missed or hate something we listed, let us know in the comments. And stop trying to correct everyone all the time, it’s unnerving.

What delicious company to be in.

And what wonderful advice to heed.

We’re not able to speak to the liquid, (I swear we left our address on this website somewhere *Hint Hint*) but Signature Brew has some good taste in music.

Dyckman Brewing Co., Queens Brewery & Other Half Brewing joined the NYC Brewers Guild.

A Brooklyn Bar raised its weekend drinking age to 25.

Amsterdam is taking its clean streets initiative to a new level.

Hello Brokelyn, We love you. Come visit!

 

Brooklyn Brewery BrooklynBrewery Brooklyn Lager Brooklyn Brewery Mash Garrett Oliver Steve Hindy Brooklyn Lager BrooklynLager Sorachi #GoldDots

This Week in Beer: The News You Can Booze

This-Week-in-Beer-News

This Week in Beer will be an aggregator of stories we thought were important or fun in our world of potables. If you saw something we missed or hate something we listed, let us know in the comments. And stop trying to correct everyone all the time, it’s unnerving.

Our friend Chuck, fighting the good fight.

Gobble Gobble

Yuengling is having a hard month. Seriously.

Ladies who Lager.

Robot Fight!

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. (Cheers to Saveonbrew for the work they do.)

Brooklyn Brewery BrooklynBrewery Brooklyn Lager Brooklyn Brewery Mash Garrett Oliver Steve Hindy Brooklyn Lager BrooklynLager Sorachi #GoldDots

Mash Files: Pittsburgh

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Mash Pittsburgh was deliciously nuzzled between two amazing meals, a dinner at the soon to open Butcher in The Rye, and a collaborative fall dinner at White Oak Farm, with five of the cities culinary juggernauts. The week began in the kitchen making perogies with Chef Richard Deshantz owner of meat and potatoes, and Nine On Nine. Richard opened the first Gastro Pub in Pittsburgh and is playing an integral role in revitalizing downtown Pittsburgh’s culinary scene. Downtown is transforming slowly, but outside of the city center Pittsburgh’s neighborhoods like the strip, and Lawrenceville (where you can enjoy the 40 taps at Industry Public House, or the recent brews at, Hop Farm Brewery a dinner at Cure, the Firehouse Farmers Market, or fill your sweet tooth at Mon Aimee chocolate shop), are setting the tone for the rest of the city.

Butcher in the Rye, this Mad Hatter ode to J.D Salinger is the most interesting restaurant space I have seen this year. At this downtown locale Clock Work Orange meets your favorite hunting lodge, where Stanley Kubrick and Jack Nicholson (think The Shining) would happily meet for bourbon’s and an excellent small plate meal. Butcher boasts one of the largest bourbon collections in the country, and with a an upstairs bar-lounge with barrel aged pre-mixed cocktails on tap will prove to be one the finest drinking institutions in the Pittsburgh area. Rich designed and built the restaurant himself, and never has a restaurant reflected the true nature of a chef more. From the bunny paws that lead to a butchered rabbit on the floor to the tattooed arm that leads you towards the bathroom, boasting the coolest locks I have ever seen not a single detail has been overlooked. This attention to detail carried over into the dishes we created, and paired with a fall worthy selection of our beers.

One of the things that makes Pittsburgh unique is the amount of Chef owned and operated restaurants. Our Sunday Dinner at White Oak Farm boasted three of the city’s top chefs and budding restaurateurs. Each owns all or part of their establishment and run their kitchens with passion, enthusiasm and respect for their ingredients, and their staff. From charcuterie made with heritage breed pigs (Justin Severino, Chef and owner of Cure), to ingredients harvested from her own farm (Kate Romane, Chef Owner of E2), or serious artisan sausage skills, beak to testicle cooking, and creator of the best parsnip soup I have ever eaten (Keith Fuller, Chef and owner of Root 174), I was deeply impressed by these chefs, and honored to share a grill with them on one of the nicest fall days of the year. I will drink homemade moonshine with those crazy folks anytime!

Working a farm dinner with David Cross‘ twin brother Justin Severino is always fun and the banter was as entertaining as the food, and as dry as colorful as our Brooklyn Brown Ale punch. Cocktails provided by bartender  and owner of Acacia, Lynn Falk, and an array of Brooklyn beer kept our jokes quick and punchy, and made for a much more receptive audience. Adam Milliron  snapped photos as over 80 guests enjoyed family style plates that welcomed their beer parings. Kriek, part of our Brooklyn Ghost Bottle Series melded perfectly with a kimchi sausage, and black bean fermented rice, funk met funk head on, and the rounded bourbon barrel accents softened the tartness of the cherries and subdued the depth of heat and acidity from the kimchi infused sausage and black rice.

The camaraderie, humbleness and level of knowledge being passed down in Pittsburgh kitchens from seasoned executive chefs and owners to the younger generation of talent will ensure that Pittsburgh continues to grow and evolve in a culinary capacity. Food writers like Hal B. Klein, and photographers like Adam Milleron are documenting the food, flavors, beers, cocktails, farmers, butchers, brewers and culinary faces of Pittsburgh, forging a vital link with a public eager for industry growth. Combine these folks with the role that Slow Food and other organizations are playing and you have a town poised for explosive culinary growth. Pittsburgh was once famous for its steel, coal, and pig iron, but now its heritage pigs and cast iron skillets are drawing the crowd.

Mash Files: Chicago Edition

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Chicago Mash

All Mash Cities have a certain charm, but Chicago is the city I had the most trouble saying goodbye to. Diverse neighborhoods bleed into each other ripe with unique and delectable restaurants serving fall inspired dishes with a laid back feel. I haven’t experienced this concentration of incredible eating locales in any other city but the one I reside in. The array of talented chefs that grace this town are not doing anything incredibly different than other cities we have visited along the Mash, but they are doing it consistently, creatively  and  collaboratively across the board. The “Shi” is an artistic metropolis with a true neighborhood feel, offering as many cultural perspectives as The Bean (Cloud Gate) itself. Steel bridges connect this lakeside city and add as much character as the myriad restaurants we frequented.

Lake Michigan provides a gorgeous city backdrop, but it also creates the brisk winds and chilling temps that make Chicago one of the coldest cities in the country. I think the chefs there understand this better than others and truly value the short growing season, preserving the rich bounty for the cold months to come, and honoring the fresh ingredients in a simple, yet sophisticated manner. The network of chefs that I encountered was truly inspiring, and everyone seemed to know everyone creating a culinary community that spans many bridges.

Slow supper prep at Found restaurant reminded me of Chris Sheppard’s kitchen (at Underbelly, Houston), with more preserves and pickles then I could imagine. The walk in refrigerator boasts a rainbow of pickled produce that could have easily been an installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Packed Mason jars abounded like the preservation kitchen at Blackberry Farm, as captivating as the amphitheater and BP Bridge in Millennium Park, by architect and artist Frank Gehry. Nicole Pederson might be a pickle queen but she sure knows her way around rabbit rillettes, and presses a mean goat pate that tastes of barnyard and pistachio, a perfect accompaniment for one of our Ghost Bottles of Crochet Rouge Riesling. Combined with pickled sausage, fresh made mustard, and sweet but tangy plum butter. This course and many others demonstrated the typical style of many of the chefs we encountered, with a full understanding of local ingredients and a playful, yet traditional approach.

Small Bar’s rabbit pate, marmalade, and parsley salad also accented the nuances of Crochet Rouge Sauvignon Blanc, expertly prepared by Executive Chef Justin White.  Ghost Bottles graced the tables at both of our meals, but  Carnegie Special 175th Anniversary Porter was most appropriate in capturing the essence of our 1883 World Fair Slow Supper feast, and a perfect accompaniment to the dramatic reading by Paul Durica, author of Chicago by Day and Night, as well as the delectable poached pear and sponge cake it was served with.

Our week of Mash events melded perfectly  with the intoxicating energy of Chicago, from its many farmers markets, artistic and thoughtfully designed green spaces, diverse neighborhoods, talented chefs, and impressive architecture. From Longman and Eagle, to Lula café, Nightwood, Fat Rice, Little Goat, there were more great restaurants then I could imagine, or find time to eat at. Whether sitting in a hole in the wall Mexican place on the east side, dining on Randolph street, or out in Evanston you can be sure that Chicago’s food scene will leave you satiated, smiling, and extremely impressed. I just hope your stay is longer than mine. I am in agreement with my cousin Ari, Chicago may be the greatest city in the country, at least four months out of the year. I hope your larders are packed for the remaining eight months. Stay warm Chicago, can’t wait to see you next year!

This Week in Beer: The News You Can Booze

This-Week-in-Beer-News

This Week in Beer will be an aggregator of stories we thought were important or fun in our world of potables. If you saw something we missed or hate something we listed, let us know in the comments. And stop trying to correct everyone all the time, it’s unnerving.

The huge news we’ve got down our spines this week is the purchase of Boulevard Brewing Company by Duvel. We wish them all the luck in the Belgian world.

~Read about the acquisiton here. Notice the part where we get called a success!

~Shutdown is over, but Food Republic used a great image for this article.

~Bank of America profiled us in their Partnering Locally series.

~Steve had a lot of press this week.

~Our friends at Kelso have nice cans.

~I can’t tell if Huff Post gets it or not.

~A Buzzfeed post where we might actually learn something.

~This is the most disappointing map I’ve ever seen.

~Pittsburgh here we come.

And if you haven’t seen it, this makes me want to re-imagine all of our labels just to get on the list. Maybe a Brooklyn “B” dancing around the can?

 

This Week in Beer: TTB Breakdown Edition

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This Week in Beer will be an aggregator of stories we thought were important or fun in our world of potables. If you saw something we missed or hate something we listed, let us know in the comments. And stop trying to correct everyone all the time, it’s unnerving.

The big story this week is the TTB breakdown. If ever there was a time for a beer summit, this would be it, we’ll host.

~Our very own Carla Villa on the story.

~With an even more indepth look here.

~We hope our bretheren at Pyramid Brewing stay strong.

~Because who needs people.

~But sometimes dreams do come true.

~And of course there might be some sort of group meeting going on in Denver.